Up at Sunrise

What would summer in Western Washington be without a trip to Mount Rainier? This mid-century postcard shows a couple of park visitors marveling at the snow-capped mountain from the road to Sunrise.

Sunrise is the second-most visited spot in Mount Rainier National Park, and at 6,400 feet, is the highest point you can drive to in the park. Sunrise, located on the east side of Mount Rainier, boasts a log visitor’s center and is a popular spot for hikers.

Mount Rainier Viewpoint
Mount Rainier from Sunrise Point.

The postcard above shows Sunrise Point, located at an elevation of 6,100 feet. On a clear day, it is possible to see Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood, Mount Baker, Mount Adams, and Mount Stuart from this point. Sunrise Point also offers views of Sunrise Lake, and the entrance to several trails.

Postcard Back
Mount Rainier from Observation Point. A famous vantage point on the highway to Sunrise Park on the northeast slopes of Washington’s famous mountain.
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Entiat Senior Key, 1967

Senior Key-chain

Here is a lovely keychain from 1967– a senior key from Entiat High School!

Front Detail

When I acquired this piece, it was missing its key ring, so I loaned it an old silver ring that was lying around. The actual keychain is a bronze color, emblazoned with orange and black, the Entiat Tigers’ school colors, and the words “Senior, ’67.” The reverse side is smooth bronze, engraved with “Herff Jones”, the manufacturer of the key.

Back

Myrtle Lake

Myrtle Lake Front
This undated postcard shows serene Myrtle Lake, located several miles from the end of the road in the Entiat Valley.

Myrtle Lake is located in the Entiat Valley of Central Washington. The hike is approximately 4 miles one way, with the trailhead located at the end of Entiat River Road. There are fish in the lake, and sometimes deer can be spotted along the shore.

Myrtle Lake back
Myrtle Lake is the Entiat Valley approach to the North Cascades parkland– a wilderness threshold on the east side of the mountain country considered by many to be America’s scenic climax. Left unspoiled, this can be a perpetual attraction to the traveler.

Due to damage from last year’s Duncan Fire, the trail is currently closed.

Myrtle Lake 2003
Myrtle Lake in 2003.